David Lubar (davidlubar) wrote,
David Lubar
davidlubar

Between you and me, this is about to get ugly


... an agent on a panel at a writer's conference...
... a writer who teaches language arts...
... a member of a prestigious book-award committee...
... a comedian who acts like he's an intellectual...
... countless newscasters...
... a handful of editors...

I've heard all of them speak sentences such as, "They gave the book to my friend and I," or "The note was for him and I."

AAARRGGHH! It's not that hard. We all learned the phrase "object of a preposition" in school. If prepositions take objects, then the pronouns should be objective pronouns. My grammar is far from perfect, and there are some things I will never master, but this one can be solved without a reference book. When in doubt, just remove the conjunction. Nobody would ever say, "They gave the book to I," or "The note was for I." (My language guru tells me this is called "hypercorrection." The speaker is aware there is an issue, but attempts to correct what is already correct.) I know it's tacky to rant about grammar, and I don't expect the general public or the average newscaster to get this right, but it's hard to sit still when I hear this from writers, or from people who are supposed to be judging books for literary merit. Okay, I'll stop now. Thanks for listening to me.
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